FAQ

/FAQ

For the most part, scooters require very little maintenance. It varies a little between the models we offer, but regular motor oil and gear oil changes should keep you scooting for quite some time.  Like a traditional car, batteries, belts, filters, tires, and spark plugs will occasionally need to be checked and possibly replaced.  Unlike a traditional car, most wear items (including tires) cost less than $50 on most scooters!

Scooter motors only carry around 1qt oil, so it gets dirty much sooner. On the flip side it requires much less oil per change so we are able to use a higher quality lubricant for much less than an equivalent car oil change.

We suggest coming in for regular oil changes every 1000 miles after the initial 200 mile break-in.

Not all bikes follow the same maintenance guidelines, ultimately it’s best to check your user manual and follow the instructions provided.

Much like licenses, helmet laws vary from state to state. In Texas, if you are 21 and have an applicable health insurance plan, you do not have to wear a helmet.

For obvious reasons, Scoots recommends riders wear full safety gear anytime they plan on riding. Scoots does require ALL rental clients to wear a helmet for extra safety.

For more information, visit the Texas DPS site here

That depends primarily on motor size, but also factors like size of the rider, weather, tire size, performance parts, etc. Our 50cc bikes can all easily do 30-35 and some can top out in the 50s.

Larger motors greatly increase acceleration.  For all the speed demons out there, our larger scooters can handle highway speeds with ease!

All of our scooters recommend 91 octane or higher. This is readily available at all gas stations. Most stations also offer lower octane fuels; while a single tank will likely not cause issues, repeated use can shorten the life of your motor.

If you accidentally use a lower octane, just pay close attention to the motor and listen for irregular noises. If you hear anything, either bring it in to us or drain and replace the remaining fuel in the tank.

Motorcycle and scooter laws vary from state to state. All riders must follow the laws of the state in which their license was issued (For example, if your driver’s license is from Lousiana, you would follow Louisiana licensing laws). In Texas, if the scooter is on the Texas Certified Moped List, you need an M LICENSE WITH A K RESTRICTION, also referred to as a Moped License by Texas Transportation Code Sec 521.225.  If your scooter is not on the certified moped list (like the Honda Ruckus for example), you need an unrestricted Motorcycle License if you’re over 18, or a Restricted Motorcycle License if your 15-17, according to Texas Transportation Code Sec 521.224.

 

More info on the licensing can be found here:

Texas DPS Website’s Moped Section – Click Here

The Texas DPS website tells you to print off the Moped Affidavit and take it to the local tax office for your K-Restricted M License.  In our personal attempts to follow this process, we have been turned away and told to go to the DMV or DPS office.

 

Texas DMV Website’s Moped Section – Click Here

The Texas DMV website tells you to take the Motorcycle Knowledge Exam at you local DPS website to receive your Moped License.  In our personal attempts to follow this process, we have been repeatedly turned away and told to come back after we’ve taken the Motorcycle Safety Course.  Which is not correct according to Texas Transportation Code, the DPS website or their own DMV website.

 

Certified Moped List – Click Here

Moped Affidavit (used by dealers and manufacturers to add new scooters/mopeds to the Texas Certified Moped List) – Click Here

Texas Transportation Code Section 521 – Click Here (section 521.225)

Motorcycle Operator’s Manual – Click Here

Texas DPS Requirement PDF – Click Here

According to the DPS requirement chart, you must take the Motorcycle Training Course for a Moped License – this info is conflicting with the DPS website, DMV website & the Texas Transportation Code.  AGAIN, to be safe, take the MSF course and get your full motorcycle license anyway.

 

 

The State of Texas does require that you carry liability insurance coverage on your scooter.  The current state minimum limits are 30/60/25.  Fortunately, scooter insurance is WAY CHEAP!  Typical coverage runs about $80 for the WHOLE YEAR!  You can add comprehensive and collision coverage on most scooters for around $30/mo.  That would cover you in case of an at fault accident, theft, vandalism, etc.

Scoots has a licensed insurance agent on staff, so we can explain coverages and even set up your insurance on site.  Now that’s what I call convenient!

This also varies greatly based on model and motor size, but our lineup ranges from 75-140 mpg advertised. You can take a look at our Products Page to see all of our models and associated MPG.

Just like cars there is a scooter parking pass for both Texas A&M and Blinn campuses. The good news is, they’re typically cheaper! Texas A&M scooter permits only cost $46/yr (or $92/yr if you don’t have a car pass).  Blinn motorcycle permits cost $75 for the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters.

These passes are different from car passes in that they let you park in any designated motorcycle area. Texas A&M campus has over 60 different lots to choose from, come check out our map to find the best locations for you!

Contact your school for more instructions on how to purchase one of these.

Scooter batteries are much smaller than car batteries.  Because of this, their magical power to start your scooter dissipates more quickly. Frequent riding can often be enough to prevent this, but a battery trickle charger can also be a useful tool to keep your scoot ready to go at a moment’s notice!  We keep trickle chargers in stock and they sell for around $50.  They attach to your battery and plug into a wall outlet to keep your battery fully charged.

If your bike doesn’t want to start using the electric start, try these steps;
1) Check the electronics. When you turn the key to on, does anything respond (blinkers or brake lights)? If no, ensure your kill switch is in the ON position.  If there are still no signs of life, it’s likely that your battery is dead.
2) Some older models come standard with a choke, this can help a cold motor come back to life. Be sure to turn the choke off once the bike has warmed up to operating temperatures.  If your bike doesn’t have a manual choke, it’s likely an Automatic Choke (AKA Fuel Enricher Circuit), try holding about 1/3 throttle and try to start.
3) Check fuel. You’d be surprised how often this is the issue. If your scooter has a manual petcock (typically older scooters) then ensure that this is not set to off.
4) Attempt to kickstart. Scooters will charge the battery on their own much like the alternator in your car. Almost all of our models come with a kickstart lever. Turn they key on and try and kick it over. If this works, be sure to ride around for a few minutes to let your charging system properly charge the battery.

Yes! Scoots works with several providers to bring you the best in aftermarket parts available. This includes (but certainly isn’t limited to) shocks, forks, big bores, and exhausts.

We also have a full service shop and are more than willing to install your go-fast bits!

Bring it to Scoots and we will recharge and test your battery at no cost!  If it needs to be replaced, we will probably have your battery in stock! If not, we can order it for you.

It is possible, but the electrical system in your scooter is designed to operate at a much lower amperage. Jump starting a scooter with a car will likely damage the scooter’s electronics which will lead to costly repairs. We recommend purchasing a battery trickle charger if your battery needs to recharged. Or bring it to Scoots and we can test and recharge your battery at no cost!

Most scooter batteries must be charged at less than 1100mA.

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For the most part, scooters require very little maintenance. It varies a little between the models we offer, but regular motor oil and gear oil changes should keep you scooting for quite some time.  Like a traditional car, batteries, belts, filters, tires, and spark plugs will occasionally need to be checked and possibly replaced.  Unlike a traditional car, most wear items (including tires) cost less than $50 on most scooters!

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If you don’t see your question, please don’t hesitate to CONTACT US via phone, text, email or smoke signal!

For the most part, scooters require very little maintenance. It varies a little between the models we offer, but regular gear and motor oil changes should keep you scooting for quite some time.  Like a traditional car, batteries, belts, filters, tires, and spark plugs will occasionally need to be checked and possibly replaced.  Unlike a traditional car, most wear items (including tires) cost less than $50 for the majority of scooters!

Scooter motors only carry a quart or less of oil, so it gets dirty much sooner. On the flip side it requires much less oil per change so we are able to use a higher quality lubricant for much less than an equivalent car oil change.

We suggest coming in for regular oil changes every 500 miles after the initial 200 mile break-in.

Not all bikes follow the same maintenance guidelines, ultimately it’s best to check your user manual and follow the instructions provided.

Motorcycle and scooter laws vary from state to state. All riders must follow the laws of the state in which their license was issued (For example, if your driver’s license is from Lousiana, you would follow Louisiana licensing laws). In Texas, if the scooter is 50cc (if you see scooters listed as 50cc on our site, they are actually 49.9 or less), you do not need a full class M license.  More information can be found here : http://www.dmv.org/tx-texas/other-types.php

We strongly recommend all riders complete a Motorcycle Safety Foundation course, even if you’re riding a 49cc scooter. We will provide our MSF certified course, ScootSmart, to our customers for $200. If you purchase a scooter from us, you’ll receive a hefty discount on the ScootSmart course!

Much like licenses, helmet laws vary from state to state. In Texas, if you are 21 and have an applicable health insurance plan, you do not have to wear a helmet.

For obvious reasons, Scoots recommends riders wear full safety gear anytime they plan on riding. Scoots will also require all rental clients to wear a helmet for their safety.

For more information, visit the Texas DPS site here

That depends primarily on motor size, as well as other factors like size of the rider, weather, and components used. Our 50cc bikes can all easily do 30-35 and some can top out in the 50s.

Larger motors greatly increase acceleration.  For all the speed demons out there, our largest bike, the SYM Citycom 300 can handle highway speeds with ease!

All of our scooters recommend 91 octane or better. This is readily available at all gas stations. Most stations also offer lower octane fuels; while a single tank will likely not cause issues, repeated use can shorten the life of your motor.

If you accidentally use a lower octane, just pay close attention to the motor and listen for irregular noises. If you hear anything, either bring it in to us or drain and replace the remaining fuel in the tank.

This also varies greatly based on model and motor size, but our lineup ranges from 75-140 mpg advertised. You can take a look at our Products Page to see all of our models and associated MPG.

Just like cars there is a scooter parking pass for both Texas A&M and Blinn campuses. The good news is, they’re typically cheaper! Texas A&M scooter permits only cost $46/yr (or $92/yr if you don’t have a car pass).  Blinn motorcycle permits cost $75 for the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters.

These passes are different from car passes in that they let you park in any designated motorcycle area. Texas A&M campus has over 60 different lots to choose from, come check out our map to find the best locations for you!

Contact your school for more instructions on how to purchase one of these.

Scooter batteries are much smaller than car batteries.  Because of this, their magical power to start your scooter dissipates more quickly. Frequent riding can often be enough to prevent this, but a battery trickle charger can also be a useful tool to keep your scoot ready to go at a moment’s notice!  We keep trickle chargers in stock and they sell for around $50.  They attach to your battery and plug into a wall outlet to keep your battery fully charged.

If your bike doesn’t want to start using the electric start, try these steps;
1) Check the electronics. When you turn the key to on, does anything respond (blinkers or brake lights)? If no, ensure your kill switch is in the ON position.  If there are still no signs of life, it’s likely that your battery is dead.
2) Some older models come standard with a choke, this can help a cold motor come back to life. Be sure to turn the choke off once the bike has warmed up to operating temperatures.  If your bike doesn’t have a manual choke, it’s likely an Automatic Choke (AKA Fuel Enricher Circuit), try holding about 1/3 throttle and try to start.
3) Check fuel. You’d be surprised how often this is the issue. If your scooter has a manual petcock (typically older scooters) then ensure that this is not set to off.
4) Attempt to kickstart. Scooters will charge the battery on their own much like the alternator in your car. Almost all of our models come with a kickstart lever. Turn they key on and try and kick it over. If this works, be sure to ride around for a few minutes to let your charging system properly charge the battery.

Yes! Scoots works with several providers to bring you the best in aftermarket parts available. This includes (but certainly isn’t limited to) shocks, forks, big bores, and exhausts.

We also have a full service shop and are more than willing to install your go-fast bits!

If your scooter battery is dead, you can bring it to Scoots and we will test and recharge your battery at no cost! If it needs to be replaced, we will probably have your battery in stock! If not, we can order it for you.

It is possible, but the electrical system in your scooter is designed to operate at a much lower amperage. Jump starting a scooter with a car will likely damage the scooter’s electronics which will lead to costly repairs. We recommend purchasing a battery trickle charger if your battery needs to recharged. Or bring it to Scoots and we can test and recharge your battery at no cost!

Most scooter batteries must be charged at less than 1100mA.

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